Archive for the ‘Producer’ Category

Der Schinken im Sandwich

Februar 22, 2017

Mit der eins a Berufsbeschreibung von Keith Richards im Kopf – er fragte den späteren Stones Produzenten Don Was, ob er wirklich der Schinken zwischen den Sandwich-Broten Jagger & Richards sein wolle – verleibe ich mir jetzt Teil 3 der Arte Doku „Achtung, Aufnahme! In den Schmieden des Pop (Beruf: Produzent)“ ein!

(Teil 1, Teil 2)

Advertisements

(Da)s Layer?

Januar 31, 2017

Mein neuer Assoziationsanker für rhythmisches Layering
#Overdubs, #vertikalesProduzieren, #mehrals4Schichten, #hybridizeddrumsounds

slayer

Das Bild ist ein Screenshot von Roger Guàrdias Video “ NO. &Rosàs Manifesto 2014

Let’s Dance

Januar 15, 2017

Zur Steigerung von Omar Hakim’s Viertel-lastigen Groove wird die Snare in der Bridge auf der Zählzeit „zwei“ in ein 16tel Ping-Pong Delay geschickt (mit drei Wiederholungen). Im Outro ist es dann die Zählzeit „vier“.
Da auch Tony Thompson einige Titel des Let’s Dance Albums trommelte, verweise ich auf einen ähnlichen Groove von ihm, der ebenso auf fetten Viertelnoten basiert und auch mit einem Echo aufgehübscht wurde: Addicted to Love
(Das sind übrigens zwei der vielen Beispiele aus meinem Echodrums.pdf)

PS. Auf dem 83er Bowie Album werden beide Drummer genannt, jedoch ohne konkreten Bezug auf die von ihnen getrommelten Songs. Der Blog https://bowiesongs.wordpress.com/ bringt Licht ins Dunkel:

>>* Rodgers deliberately didn’t list on which Let’s Dance tracks Omar Hakim and Tony Thompson drummed (Rodgers’ theory was that it helped session players to have a communal credit, so each could take credit for the whole record). Rodgers has only publicly confirmed that Thompson was on “Modern Love.” Conjecture is that Thompson did most of the drumming with the exception of the title track and “China Girl” (which he may still be on anyhow), but as Hakim was Thompson’s disciple, their styles are fairly similar and it’s hard to tell the two apart on this record.<<
https://bowiesongs.wordpress.com/2011/10/25/without-you/

>>“Let’s Dance,” the first song recorded for the album that it named, was crafted in the Power Station. Bowie already had recorded Scary Monstersthere, but by 1982, the Station had developed its trademark drum sound: gated snare reverb. It was the crushing beat of Let’s Dance, as well of the Eighties. While Visconti’s Harmonizer-altered drums on Low was a predecessor of the sound,4 the “classic” Eighties gated snare was developed concurrently at the Power Station by engineers like Bob Clearmountain, and at London’s Townhouse, where in 1980, on Peter Gabriel’s third album, Hugh Padham developed the sound for Phil Collins’ drum tracks.5

Engineers were always trying to better record the “snap” of a snare drum being hit. It’s an endless task, as a recording never quite captures the exact sound when heard live. Attempts at miking the snare in a reverb-heavy room like the Power Station wound up with the mike also picking up all of the echoes of the snare hit, and so muddying/dissipating its power. Power Station and Townhouse engineers hit upon the same solution: place a close mike (to capture the actual hit) and then a pair of stereo “ambiance” mikes above the kit, the latter using high compression and equipped with noise gates (so the mikes would capture the reverb of a stick hitting the snare for a half second or so, then snap off). This way engineers could get the hard “snap” of the hit with a dose of explosive reverb, yet without any secondary echoes.

So the snare hit became abstracted—it became a block of pure force, as precise and as alien-sounding as a drum machine but with more power. This sort of inhuman precision, an acoustic instrument turned into a synthetic giant of itself, defines “Let’s Dance”—not just Omar Hakim’s drums but even Figueroa’s percussion sounds like a mechanical rattlesnake. That’s not to downplay the brilliant workings of Rodgers’ arrangement: the way the horns and the bass play off each other, Hakim’s intricate bass drum pattern, which only repeats every eight bars (Duran Duran later admitted stealing it for “Union of the Snake”), the wide use of space in the mix, so that every instrument’s appearance seems like an event.

4: In 1983, Bowie described the Low drum sound as “that “mash” drum sound, that depressive, gorilla effect set down the studio drum fever fad for the next few years. It was something I wish we’d never created, having had to live through four years of it with other English bands, until it started changing into the “clap” sound we’ve got now.

5 Collins fell in love with the gated snare. Besotted, he dedicated his work in the Eighties to its worship: cf. the Collins-produced “I Know There Something Going On” by Frida, in which the former ABBA singer fights for her life against a set of all-devouring drums.
Greg Milner’s excellent Perfecting Sound Forever was key to understanding the development of the gated snare. Thanks to Lance Hoskins for sending me the Let’s Dance full band score some time ago.<<
https://bowiesongs.wordpress.com/2011/10/20/lets-dance/

 

 

Wendel

Januar 13, 2017

>>“We started using sequencing and stuff on [Steely Dan’s] Gaucho,“ replies Fagen, „out of desperation really. We were having trouble laying down ‚Hey Nineteen‘. We tried it with two different bands and it still didn’t work, so one of us said something like ‚It’s too bad that we can’t get a machine to play the beat we want, with full-frequency drum sounds, and to be able to move the snare drum and kick drum around independently.‘ Roger [Nichols] replied ‚I can do that.‘ This was back in 1978 or something, so we said ‚You can do that???‘ To which he said ‚Yes, all I need is $150,000.‘ So we gave him the money out of our recording budget, and six weeks later he came in with this machine and that is how it all started.“<< [Donald Fagen in SoundOnSound, 2006]

192_roger-soundworks-3m81-960x450

So beginnt vor knapp vierzig Jahren die Geschichte des Wendel, dem ersten digitalen Drum-Replacement-Tool.

Robert Nichols: >>We found that there were certain feels that we couldn’t get out of real drummers — they weren’t steady enough. So we had to design something that would do it perfectly, but with some human feeling, the right amount of layback. Instead of just one high-hat sound that repeats machine-like over and over, we had sixteen different ones, so it had the inflections. Wendel can play exactly what the drummer plays — if he plays a little early or a little hard, Wendel plays it a little early or a little hard. Play it once, Wendel memorizes the song, then you play it again and it repeats what it hears.<< [1993, Quelle]

Hier noch ein Spruch aus der Bedienungsanleitung des weiterentwickelten Wendel Jr. (1984):
>>WENDELjr is NOT another drum machine. WENDELjr is a state of the art, digital, percussion sound replacement device. That is, the basic function is to replace the horrible drum sounds produced by any ‚drum machine‘, and replace drum sounds already recorded on tape, whether they were produced by a machine or a real drummer.

There is no need to use pre-delayed triggers with WENDELjr’s trigger input. The trigger response time is so quick (total trigger delay does not exceed 32 microseconds), that in many cases the new drum sound may appear as if it were happening early. In addition to the ultra- fast triggering, the drum sound can be tuned over a 2 octave range from the front panel control.<<

Dennoch schlußfolgerte Mr. Fagen in oben erwähnten Interview:
>> It took so long. It got a little better during The Nightfly, but it was so horrible, I have tried to figure out how to get out of sampling ever since.“<<

gelber Schnee, Tony Thompson, Sound Design

Januar 12, 2017

Guter Zappa Ratschlag von 1974: „Don’t eat the yellow snow

Und eine Ansage von Bernard Edwards gleich hinterher (damals, in den Anfangstagen von „Chic“  an Tony Thompson gerichtet):

>>Get rid of all that shit. Just keep a bass drum, snare, and hi-hat. When you master that, then maybe I’ll add another cymbal or drum.<<

Als Beweis natürlich noch einen T.T. Groove-Meilenstein mit ebendiesem „fast Nichts“:

>>I remember my drums were set up in the room, and there was a door that led to a hallway. The engineer, Jason Cosaro, took a tube the size of my bass drum and built this tunnel from my bass drum all the way out into the hall and up the stairs. It was this weird thing he hooked up. And it worked. The groove in the house was so thick, and what am I playing? A simple, Boom-Bop-Tish-Bop-Boom-Bop. It was unbelievable – I locked into that with everyone else swinging, and it brought the walls down.<<
[Die Zitate entstammen einem Modern Drummer Interview aus 2002]

fullsizerender

Lässig geschnittenes Intro (mit eingeschobenem 3/4 Takt) und der schiebende Mainloop (inklusive Kick-Echo).

Who is Chris Scholar

Dezember 19, 2016

Das Trio des Schlagzeugers Jaimeo Brown hat mich auf der Jazz Ahead 2013 beeindruckt, da wurde freie Improvisation mit einem (oldschool Roland) Mehrspur Playback interessant kombiniert. Sein Album „Work Song“ war eines der Highlights 2016.

Erst jetzt habe ich über dieses Interview gecheckt, dass es sich beim Playbackmaster und Gitarristen um Chris Scholar – Bruder von Kelvin (mit ihm und Christian Prommer hatte ich mal einen Drumlessons Gig in Mazedonien gespielt) – handelt. Die Neugierde ist geweckt und ich werde mittels „Who is Chris Scholar“ (free Mixtape) und „Moved to LA“ mal tiefer in die Materie eindringen.

Und anschließend werde ich wohl doch auch noch in die neue A Tribe Called Quest Platte reinhören.

The Fundaments of Groove: A Systematic Exploration of Drum Patterns in Popular Music

Dezember 16, 2016

Ich hatte im Off-Beat Magazin über eine Untersuchung der Hochschule Luzern zum Thema Groove gelesen und mich promt neugierig in das Projekt „The Fundaments of Groove: A Systematic Exploration of Drum Patterns in Popular Music“ eingewählt.
>>Die Studie ist eine explorative Untersuchung von 250 ikonischen Drumpatterns, gespielt von 50 der einflussreichsten Schlagzeuger in Funk, Rock, Metal, Fusion, R&B oder Pop. Die Drum Beats werden transkribiert und performative Aspekte (Timing, Dynamik) extrahiert. Schliesslich werden die Patterns auf Basis von Samples als realistisch klingende Tonaufnahmen rekonstruiert. […] Die Groovequalitäten der rekonstruierten Drum Patterns werden im Rahmen eines online durchgeführten Hörexperiments (https://www.soscisurvey.de/1520160/) von einer grossen Gruppe von Hörerinnen und Hörern bewertet.<<

Obwohl mich das Spiel sehr gereizt hat, vor allem dabei die gehörten Beats erkennen und benennen zu können, wurde ich zunehmend gereizter und musste leider schon nach elf Beispielen abbrechen. Der Grund dafür waren die eintönigen Midifiles und immergleichen Samples, also eine Entkopplung von Pattern und dem originalen, charakteristischen Sound, was die Einordnung sehr oft erschwerte und die Bewertung/Einordnung trübte. (Denke ich an das Original beim Auskunftgeben, oder bewerte ich das eben gehörte? Die Antworten weichen stark voneinander ab.)

Fazit aus der Hüfte: auch wenn es „nur“ um das Fundament von Groove gehen soll, funktioniert für mich die Trennung von Pattern und Originalklang überhaupt nicht. Die Kombination von Midifile und einzelnen Samples bildet in keiner Weise die komplexe, sich gegenseitig bedingende Klangentwicklung beim natürlichen Rhythmusmachen (geschweige denn die zusätzliche Ebene der Studioproduktion) ab und reduziert die Musik des Grooves auf eine eindimensonale, emotionslose Maschinentätigkeit. Mir fehlen Mensch und Mojo.
Insofern würde ich mir einen zweiten Versuchsaufbau wünschen, bei dem jetzt nicht unbedingt die Großkaliber des Drum-Business hergenommen werden müssen, dafür aber authentische Schlagzeug bzw. Rhythmusspuren einer tatsächlichen Produktion aus den möglichen Stilrichtungen. (Und gerne auch Breakbeat-Klassiker in unterschiedlichen Aggregatzuständen, sowie genuin Programmiertes.)

The 10 Best Recorded Drum Sounds

Dezember 13, 2016

Mit ihrem Artikel „The 10 Best Recorded Drum Sounds“ spielt mir das DRUM! Magazine bestens in die Karten: neues Futter (Klänge und ihre Geschichten) für die Drum Sounds Datenbank (dort findest Du ähnliche Beispiele unter der Suchrubrik SONSTIGE/nice-recordings).

opener-image

Nachtrag:

hier die dazugehörigen Tracks:
1. JOHN BONHAM “WHEN THE LEVEE BREAKS” | LED ZEPPELIN IV BY LED ZEPPELIN (1971) | ENGINEER: ANDY JOHN

2. PHIL COLLINS “NO REPLY AT ALL” | ABACAB BY GENESIS (1981) | ENGINEER HUGH PADGHAM

3. RINGO STARR “STRAWBERRY FIELDS FOREVER” | MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR BY THE BEATLES (1967) | PRODUCER GEORGE MARTIN | ENGINEER GEOFF EMERICK

4. STEVE GADD “50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR LOVER” | STILL CRAZY AFTER ALL THESE YEARS BY PAUL SIMON (1975) PRODUCER PHIL RAMONE

4b CHICK COREA „THE LEPRECHAUN“ (1976)

5. JEFF PORCARO “ROSANNA” | TOTO IV BY TOTO (1982) ENGINEER AL SCHMITT

6. VINNIE COLAIUTA “SEVEN DAYS” | TEN SUMMONER’S TALES BY STING (1993) | PRODUCER/ENGINEER HUGH PADGHAM

7. JIM KELTNER “THING CALLED LOVE” | BRING THE FAMILY BY JOHN HIATT (1987) | ENGINEER LARRY HIRSCH

8. STEVE JORDAN “I DON’T TRUST MYSELF” | CONTINUUM BY JOHN MAYER (2006) | PRODUCER STEVE JORDAN

9. CHAD SMITH – EVERY TRACK | I’M WITH YOU BY RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS (2011) | PRODUCER RICK RUBIN

10. KENNY ARONOFF “SECRET AGENT” | LUCKY BY MELISSA ETHERIDGE (2004) | PRODUCERS VARIOUS

Tourgespräche

Februar 2, 2016

Markus Vieweg ist eigentlich Bassist (der Band Glasperlenspiel), aber auch ein Internet-afiner Mensch. So er hat er mit den von Apple bereitgestellten Tools ein von der Kritik gefeiertes Bass-e-Book veröffentlicht und mit seinem Blog „Tourgespräche“ eine Alternative zum klassischen Musikerinterview geschaffen. Gut vorbereitet und mit viel Zeit finden Unterhaltungen – vornehmlich mit Akteuren aus der zweiten Reihe des Showgeschäfts – jenseits der Langeweile längst bekannter Eckdaten und Fakten statt und werden zu einem anderthalbstündigen Podcast zusammengeschnitten.

IMG_5338.jpg

Wir trafen uns neulich zwischen Soundcheck und Festivalauftritt in meinem Mainzer Hotelzimmer und sprachen bei Kaffee und Kuchen über:

FOH, Mad ProfessorHeimstudioKompressormaske, Squarepusher, Bedroomproducer bzw. Zufall als neue Bestimmung, Jojo MayerVom Zitat zum Ich, Zuspieler, der „Sack um die Snare“, Echodrums, Solo-Performancesimulierter Aux-SendReverb Shots, Laurenz Theinerts Visual Piano zu meinen Organic Electro Beats 2003, Bandmensch, Rubo(W)ölpl aka (W), Aufwand und Slayer-Set auf der IAAB-Keeper/BeatSeeker, >>Das Ganze ist mehr als die Summe seiner Teile<<, selbstgebaute „Playstation“, Cover-Mukke, das persönliche innere Tempo, Interaktion dank Blog, Lesen, Cafè, Tour Catering, Netzer, nur einmal laufen!Fragebogen aus den Tagebüchern von Max Frisch

… und dabei hat mich einiges „umgehauen“…

 

 

Track-Check

Dezember 5, 2014

Lieber Stimming, inspiriert von Deinem Produktionstipps-Adventskalender, schreibe ich hier mal zwei Ansätze auf, die mir kürzlich zugetragen wurden und am treffendsten wohl unter der Überschrift „Track Check“ zusammengefasst werden könnten.

Es ist einmal diese Textstelle aus dem Buch ELECTRI_CITY ELEKTRONISCHE_MUSIK_AUS_DÜSSELDORF:
>>Wenn Ralf und Florian irgendwelche [Kraftwerk] Stücke fertiggestellt hatten, war es ihnen immer wichtig, sich die Klänge stundenlang anzuhören, um zu prüfen, ob man sie länger ertragen konnte; um etwas zu schaffen, was man auch noch noch Jahren hören konnte.<< Rainer Zicke auf Seite 192 (Suhrkamp Taschenbuch 2014)

Der andere Prüfstein kommt von Aphex Twin. Irgendwo im Netz hatte ich gelesen, dass seine Mixe auch stark verlangsamt bzw. beschleunigt sinnvoll und gut klingen sollten. Sprich: Experiment more with different pitch/tempo combo-modifications!